Broadcasting our private lives, one hack at a time

Through a combination of cyber laziness, poor practices by vendors and manufacturers and lax security, we're all exposed

Broadcasting our private lives, one hack at a timeWithin the traditionally sacred walls of our homes, we felt safe from prying eyes. Once the curtains were drawn and the doors shut, we felt we could say and do things we might not in public. But are we really alone? The revelation that a Russian-based website is streaming live video from thousands of security…

Building Internet walls to protect data could penalize users

There are billions of Internet users and every corporation has a virtual finger in the pie. But privacy laws differ widely

Building Internet walls to protect data could penalize usersGeneral data protection regulations (GDPR) sound like something that the average person needs to know nothing about. On the contrary, these rules affect us on a day-to-day basis. For the last 20 years, most jurisdictions have had similar requirements regarding corporations maintaining the privacy of their consumers’ data. The differences were more to do with…

Antiquated privacy laws fail to protect Canadians

Government must update legislation in a way that addresses today's technology and prepares for future changes. And political parties can't be exempt

Antiquated privacy laws fail to protect CanadiansBy Sen. Art Eggleton and Sen. Raymonde Saint-Germain For QUOI Media Group Canadians are concerned about the protection of their private data, according to a 2016 Survey of Canadians on Privacy undertaken by the privacy commissioner of Canada. A reported 90 per cent of Canadians expressed some level of concern about data privacy and 74 per cent…

Do you know who is watching your kids?

The academic world should allow students to speak freely, make mistakes, rebel and change their minds

Do you know who is watching your kids?The Chinese educational system takes a brute force approach to teaching: memorize everything. Teachers and parents smash information into the brains of students. The result is usually astonishing. The Chinese educational system excels at teaching discipline, and students from China are, to generalize, dedicated and earnest about their education, and smart, smart, smart. Through hours…

Is Google stealing your garden furniture?

Violations of personal privacy occur on a much larger scale than anyone thought possible. But new EU rules address the problem

Is Google stealing your garden furniture?I first started to realize how dangerous social media was a few years ago. I was on the phone with a friend and I could feel his growing sense of outrage. “I can't believe it,” he said. “Google is reading my mail. They targeted me with ads that could only have come from specific words…

A twisted path brings the Cambridge Analytica scandal home to Canada

The links between Christopher Wylie, Victoria-based AggregateIQ and the Liberal Party of Canada must be probed

A twisted path brings the Cambridge Analytica scandal home to CanadaIt’s the biggest political scandal in the world. And it involves a bunch of Canadians. For some time, it’s been known that Vladimir Putin’s Russia and assorted other outlaw states, like North Korea, have been engaged in acts of cyber war against democracies around the globe. Long before special counsel Robert Mueller was hired to…

Data breach tsunami sweeps toward Liberals

In the wake of Christopher Wylie's revelations of personal information mined for political purposes, there will be damage enough for everyone

Data breach tsunami sweeps toward LiberalsIt almost seems kind of quaint. Back when the Conservative Party of Canada was running things, the commentariat were apoplectic about something called CIMS: the Constituent Information Management System. “Tory database draws ire of privacy experts,” went one CTV News headline. An “unethical invasion of Canadians' privacy,” thundered Conservative-turned-Liberal MP Garth Turner. It was “chilling,”…

The Internet provides ‘a boundless supply of victims’

So why don't we pay attention to the detail necessary to secure our information?

The Internet provides ‘a boundless supply of victims’By Brennen Schmidt ALEUS Technology Group and Allan Bonner Troy Media columnist Cops have a pretty good set of rules and responses. They look for the good and bad actors. They question everything and have a response for most eventualities. “Move along buddy” solves a lot of problems, for example. It turns out that Det.…

The digital age means we have no more secrets

Our personal information has become open access. And electronic security is a cat-and-mouse game, a cycle that never ends

The digital age means we have no more secretsIn the span of 40 years, Canadian society has gone from paper files in cabinets, to electronic storage of everything from medical records to what you had in your coffee at Starbucks this morning. Our lives have become itemized and catalogued into easily-accessed databases filled with our intimate details. We have, in fact, willingly surrendered…

Protecting your privacy in the digital age

The threat can range from someone down the street running a small business to a curious former spouse

Protecting your privacy in the digital ageBy Brennen Schmidt ALEUS Technology Group and Allan Bonner Columnist Personal information is personal. Period. Other than professional athletes and most presidential candidates, few people want the world to know what medical procedures they’ve had. People who’ve had abortions, psychiatric counselling, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or sex reassignment surgery have done so thinking it would…