What’s the media’s problem child up to?

Sam Oosterhoff has raised his voice and become a politician who genuinely cares about Canadians and our nation

The mother of a problem child was advised by a psychiatrist, “You are far too upset and worried about your son. I suggest you take tranquilizers regularly.”

On her next visit the psychiatrist asked, “Have the tranquilizers calmed you down?”

“Yes” the mother answered.

“And how is your son now?” he asked.

“Who cares?” she replied.

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That reminds me of a media quote that said, “A home schooled teenager was sworn in as the youngest-ever member of the Ontario legislature, but his socially conservative views threaten to make him the Progressive Conservatives’ problem child.” It was referring to Sam Oosterhoff, the youngest Canadian to be elected into office in the nation of Canada.

Sam said, “I was sworn in when I was 19, and was campaigning for it when I was 18.” That was two years ago and Sam Oosterhoff hasn’t wasted any time getting things done.

As assistant to Member of Parliament in Niagara West, Ontario, he picked up the cause of elder care. “I had the privilege of tabling in the Compassionate Care Act: Bill No. 3 in the provincial legislature,” he said, going on to explain further. “In the system in Ontario, there’s a failure; only 16 to 30 per cent of people have reasonable access to end of life care.” Sam’s primary recommendation has improved palliative care and its accessibility.

“What happens is people are dying in hospital, which is something that isn’t desirable. Palliative care is needed once a terminal diagnosis is given. Then you want all the support – physical, spiritual, and support of family. Palliative also helps eliminate pain in the last stages of life.

“This was an issue where all parties were in agreement and the bill went flying through. So many things are divisive and controversial, but this is an issue where we can come together to support our most vulnerable.” Oosterhoff explained. “It’s a measure that saves money. In Ontario, it costs $1,600 to $2,000 per day for a hospital patient; whereas palliative care costs $300 per day. And it improves quality of care. This is something that is becoming more of an issue as we have an increased aging population.”

This alone is a noteworthy achievement for someone so young but it’s not the only cause that Oosterhoff is taking on. As assistant to the minister of Education, he’s well aware of what’s been happening regarding the controversial issue of sex education in Ontario.

There was a public consultation on this issue, however only lobby and special interest groups supportive of the curriculum were made aware of the consultation taking place on the very first day. Consequently 1,600 positive responses rolled in, and a catchy headline by CBC announced the first days’ results: “Consultations show huge support among Ontario parents and students.” It was another example of media bias.

A huge backlash soon followed, from thousands of parents. “We’ve had a campaign to repeal sex ed. We’ve heard from tens of thousands of parents already. New immigrants said they wanted to be involved. Parents wanted to know what their kids are being taught.” Sam explained. “People from other provinces are also concerned, and they should be encouraged that when people raise their voice things can happen.”

Sam Oosterhoff has also raised his voice; he has proven to be anything but the media’s professed problem child. Instead he is a politician who genuinely cares about Canadians and our nation.

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