Unemployment spike may trigger rethink of EI program

As the system increases in generosity and accessibility in Atlantic Canada, it may perpetuate the nation’s problems with EI

Unemployment spike may trigger rethink of EI programBy Alex Whalen and Fred McMahon The Fraser Institute The spike in unemployment across Canada due to the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered changes in the employment insurance (EI) program. And those changes could lead to significant problems. When unemployment grows in any of the country’s 62 EI regions, eligibility and benefits change along with it.…

Why does the culture of impunity persist?

When words that demean others are spoken with impunity, they lead to further infringements on our dignity and rights

Why does the culture of impunity persist?The greatest danger to our way of life is the culture of impunity we’ve created. It’s an assault on truth and human dignity. This became very clear in a discourse between two members of the American House of Representatives. Ted Yoho verbally accosted and demeaned Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for expressing her views on controversial issues and…

New guidelines help people with dementia stay safe if lost

U of A researchers tap into experiences and ideas of people living with dementia to fill public information gap

New guidelines help people with dementia stay safe if lostResearchers have developed a new guideline to help people with dementia stay safe if they get lost, based partly on the experiences of those who are living with the condition. “By including people with dementia, it tells them they can be active agents in their own care and they can keep themselves safe,” said lead…

More than just a Spectator to world events

The long-running weekly publication offers depth, broad perspective on a variety of issues, and doesn’t shy away from controversy

More than just a Spectator to world eventsThe Spectator is a United Kingdom weekly first published in 1828. This purportedly makes it the longest-running magazine of its kind in the English-speaking world. And while the primary focus is current affairs, the Spectator’s subject matter ranges further than that. There’s lively coverage of books, music, film, TV, food and travel. From time to…

How to avoid conflicts on a volunteer committee

Conflicts are less likely when everyone is focused on the goal, clear about how they can contribute and appreciated for their efforts

How to avoid conflicts on a volunteer committee“I'm so tired of being ordered around or dictated to – I’m done with this!” “I can't believe they didn’t even discuss this with me. If they want to make all the decisions, then they can do it themselves.” If you've ever been on a planning committee, condo board, conference committee or not-for-profit board, you've…

Was Beethoven Black?

A Twitter meme reveals more about race and music than the composer’s origins. Social media trend is a new twist on a century-old question

Was Beethoven Black?The year 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth, and in mid-June this year, he started trending on Twitter. Perhaps it wasn’t so strange that Beethoven was popping up on social media platforms, but what was unusual and certainly unforeseen: the claim that “Beethoven was Black.” Where did this idea come from?…

In times of crisis, we need to give more

Seven in 10 charities report lower revenues. As a whole, the sector has had to lay off 84,000 full- and part-time staff in Canada

In times of crisis, we need to give moreThe pandemic hasn’t been all bad for us. For some Canadians, it’s actually meant a bit of a financial boon. That’s not to say there haven’t been massive job losses and income losses. It’s just that the losses have happened unequally. The poorest and the youngest took the worst hit. When think-tank Cardus analyzed the…

Canadians with disabilities face barriers to financial security

Study shows those living with disabilities average 25% less in assets and COVID-19 is making the situation worse

Canadians with disabilities face barriers to financial securityWhen sociologist Michelle Maroto came across a Toronto Star article about an Ontario woman struggling to make ends meet while battling Type 1 diabetes, she knew the story was just the tip of the iceberg. Anna Costa was juggling four low-paying jobs without benefits, and after paying more than $300 per month for insulin and blood tests…

We can’t dodge deficits and debt forever

A government deficit is sometimes necessary but we need plans in place to eliminate it and reduce the debt

We can’t dodge deficits and debt foreverDeficits have become emotive hot buttons. A deficit arises when governments spend more than their income, which consists mainly of taxes. If the deficiency is not immediately covered, current deficits turn into long-term government debt. No one seems to be neutral about deficits and the resulting debt. Traditional economists argue against them, saying that spending…

Stop jumping on the WE-bashing bandwagon

The charitable organization has done a great deal of good. And there are plenty of other issues that are far more problematic

Stop jumping on the WE-bashing bandwagonIt’s time to end the sensationalism about WE Charity. It’s true that the administration of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government showed a lack of judgment by handing the responsibility for a government-funded volunteer program to an organization that several members of the government and their families have been involved in. The federal Liberals have not…
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